Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Obes Res. 2005 Jun;13(6):1000-7.

Oligofructose promotes satiety in rats fed a high-fat diet: involvement of glucagon-like Peptide-1.

Author information

  • 1Université Catholique de Louvain-Unité de Pharmacocinétique, Metabolisme, Nutrition et Toxicologie 7369, 73 Avenue Mounier, B-1200 Brussels, Belgium.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To analyze the putative interest of oligofructose (OFS) in the modulation of food intake after high-fat diet in rats and to question the relevance of the expression and secretion of intestinal peptides in that context.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

Male Wistar rats were pretreated with standard diet or OFS-enriched (10%) standard diet for 35 days followed by 15 days of high-fat diet enriched or not with OFS (10%) treatment. Body weight, food intake, triglycerides, and plasma ghrelin levels were monitored during the treatment. On day 50, rats were food-deprived 8 hours and anesthetized for blood and intestinal tissue sampling for further proglucagon mRNA, glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1, and GLP-2 quantification.

RESULTS:

The addition of OFS in the diet protects against the promotion of energy intake, body weight gain, fat mass development, and serum triglyceride accumulation induced by a high-fat diet. OFS fermentation leads to an increase in proglucagon mRNA in the cecum and the colon and in GLP-1 and GLP-2 contents in the proximal colon, with consequences on the portal concentration of GLP-1 (increase). A lower ghrelin level is observed only when OFS is added to the standard diet of rats.

DISCUSSION:

In rats exposed to high-fat diet, OFS is, thus, able to modulate endogenous production of gut peptides involved in appetite and body weight regulation. Because several approaches are currently used to treat type 2 diabetes and obesity with limited effectiveness, dietary fibers such as OFS, which promote the endogenous production of gut peptides like GLP-1, could be proposed as interesting nutrients to consider in the management of fat intake and associated metabolic disorders.

PMID:
15976142
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk