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J Otolaryngol. 2005 Feb;34(1):20-4.

Ear, nose, and throat manifestations of Sjögren's syndrome: retrospective review of a multidisciplinary clinic.

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  • 1Department of Otolaryngology, North Manchester General Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the otolaryngologic manifestations of Sögren's syndrome (SS).

DESIGN:

A retrospective case study.

SETTING:

The Toronto Hospital.

METHOD:

Case note review of 196 patients evaluated in a multidisciplinary clinic for this disease. Patients were retrospectively classified according to the revised international classification.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The prevalence of subjective and objective audiologic and otorhinolaryngologic abnormalities.

RESULTS:

One hundred eleven patients were diagnosed with primary and 26 with secondary SS, leaving 60 with unclassified sicca syndrome. There was minimal otologic pathology. There was a mildly increased prevalence of sensorineural deafness in secondary SS (41-60 years, 36%; 61-80 years, 70%). Approximately 50% of patients in each group complained of nasal symptoms, but only 20% had abnormal findings on rhinoscopy. Similarly, 60 to 70% in each group complained of throat symptoms, but only 20% had abnormal findings on indirect laryngoscopy. Thirty-eight percent of primary patients had parotid gland symptoms, and 25% had abnormally swollen glands, with eight subsequently diagnosed with lymphoma. No patients in the other two groups had abnormal parotid glands.

CONCLUSIONS:

SS does not appear to be associated with increased otologic or audiologic disease, except perhaps in conjunction with systemic autoimmunity. Nose and throat symptoms are common in SS, but the complications of mucosal dryness on examination are unusual (approximately 20%). Primary SS can cause serious parotid morbidity secondary to inflammation and infection. There is also a significant risk of lymphomas that often present as parotid masses, necessitating long-term follow-up.

PMID:
15966471
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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