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J Hepatol. 2005 Aug;43(2):283-7.

Failure of hepatitis B vaccination in patients receiving lamivudine prophylaxis after liver transplantation for chronic hepatitis B.

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  • 1Centre for the Study of Liver Disease, Department of Surgery, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China. chungmlo@hkucc.hku.hk

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

Lamivudine prophylaxis against hepatitis B virus (HBV) reinfection after liver transplantation is associated with recurrence due to escape mutants.

METHODS:

Fifty-two patients on lamivudine prophylaxis at a median of 412 days (median, 370-2040 days) after transplantation for chronic HBV-related liver disease received two courses of an accelerated schedule of double-dose recombinant HBV vaccine. Before vaccination, all patients were seronegative for HBsAg, anti-HBs and HBV DNA (by qPCR). Three intramuscular doses of vaccine (40 microg each) were administered monthly and another identical course was repeated after 3 months. Lamivudine (100mg/day) was continued throughout the study.

RESULTS:

After the first course, two patients developed a weak response (anti-HBs titre of 12 mIU/mL) that disappeared rapidly. One early responder developed anti-HBs (27 mIU/mL) again after the second course but the other did not. Two other patients developed response (anti-HBs titre of 17 and 103 mIU/mL, respectively) giving an overall response rate of 7.7%. The antibody level declined rapidly. At the end of the study, one patient who did not respond had developed viral breakthrough which was treated with adefovir dipivoxil therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Active immunization with two courses of double-dose recombinant HBV vaccine has limited efficacy in patients receiving lamividine prophylaxis after liver transplantation.

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PMID:
15964658
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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