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BJOG. 2005 Jul;112(7):956-62.

The association of hysterectomy and menopause: a prospective cohort study.

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  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Women's Hospital, University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether or not hysterectomy leads to an earlier onset of the menopause.

DESIGN:

A prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Gynaecology service of large urban hospital.

POPULATION:

Premenopausal women with and without hysterectomy.

METHODS:

Multivariate survival analysis techniques were used to adjust for differences in initial follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels, body mass index, smoking and unilateral oophorectomy between the groups.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

FSH levels were measured for five years following hysterectomy and compared with the comparison group. Menopause was defined as a single FSH measurement of at least 40 IU/L.

RESULTS:

Two hundred and fifty-seven women undergoing hysterectomy were compared with 259 women who had not undergone a hysterectomy. Fifty-three women (20.6%) in the hysterectomy group and 19 women (7.3%) in the comparison group reached menopause over the five years of the study. Women in the hysterectomy group with a pre-operative FSH <10 IU/L reached menopause 3.7 years (95% CI 1.5-6.0 years) earlier than women in the comparison group independent of BMI, smoking and unilateral oophorectomy. Twenty-eight women in the hysterectomy group had unilateral oophorectomy and 10 (35.7%) of these women reached menopause over the five years of follow up. Women in the hysterectomy group with unilateral oophorectomy reached menopause 4.4 years (95% CI 0.6, 7.9 years) earlier than women with both ovaries in the hysterectomy group independent of baseline FSH, BMI and smoking.

CONCLUSIONS:

Hysterectomy is associated with an earlier onset of menopause. Hysterectomy with unilateral oophorectomy is associated with an even earlier onset of the menopause in this study.

PMID:
15957999
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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