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Appetite. 2005 Oct;45(2):110-20.

Effects of dietary and pharmacological manipulations on appetitive and consummatory aspects of feeding in non-human primates.

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  • 1Division on Substance Abuse, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 120, New York, NY 10032, USA. rwf2@columbia.edu

Abstract

This study examined how pharmacological and behavioral manipulations affect appetitive and consummatory aspects of feeding of baboons. Baboons have access to food 24 h each day, but they must complete a two-phase operant procedure in order to eat. Responding on one lever during a 30-min appetitive phase was required before animals could start a consumption phase, i.e. a meal, where responding on another lever led to food delivery. Responding during the appetitive phase resulted in presentations of food-related stimuli only. Decreasing session length, increased appetitive behavior and increased meal size. Limiting the number of meals to a single 90 min meal each day but increasing the number of food pellets the animals received increased the size of meal, but did not increase appetitive behavior. These findings suggest that time since the previous meal has a greater effect on appetitive behavior than the size of the previous meal. Amphetamine (AMPH), which increases dopamine, decreased food intake at doses that did not affect appetitive behavior, indicating that appetitive and consummatory aspects of eating can be pharmacologically differentiated. Increasing how frequently animals could earn food-related stimuli in the appetitive phase and food in the consummatory phase increased both appetitive and consumatory behavior. Under these conditions, AMPH nearly doubled appetitive behavior at doses that decreased food intake by nearly 50 percent. When animals had one meal, of self-determined duration, meal size increased without affecting appetitive behavior, further demonstrating that appetitive behavior can be independent of the size of the previous meal and not predictive of the size of the subsequent meal. Under these conditions, AMPH decreased food intake at doses that did not affect appetitive behavior. In contrast, dexfenfluramine (DFEN), which increases serotonin, decreased both appetitive and consumatory behavior. Thus, it is possible to independently manipulate the appetitive and consummatory aspects of eating using both pharmacological and behavioral interventions indicating that it may be possible to develop medications that selectively affect appetitive or consummatory aspects of eating.

PMID:
15951055
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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