Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Card Fail. 2005 Jun;11(5):333-9.

Effects of beta-blocker therapy on ventilatory responses to exercise in patients with heart failure.

Author information

  • 1Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Ventilatory efficiency is the increase in ventilation relative to carbon dioxide production during exercise. Congestive heart failure (CHF) is associated with decreased ventilatory efficiency. beta-blockers improve hemodynamics, prolong survival, and improve functional class in patients with CHF, though peak exercise performance may not improve. We hypothesized beta-blockers increase ventilatory efficiency in patients with CHF.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

The study group comprised 614 subjects with left ventricular ejection fraction < or = 40% referred for cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Clinical and exercise data were reviewed and recorded. For comparison, subjects were divided into those treated with beta-blockers (n = 195) and those not treated (n = 419). Subjects on beta-blockers had lower minute ventilation (12 +/- 4 versus 14 +/- 4 L/min, P < .001) at rest, which remained lower during submaximal and maximal exercise, by 4 and 6 L/min, respectively (P = .001). Ventilatory efficiency was increased in subjects treated with beta-blockers at submaximal (32 +/- 6 versus 34 +/- 7, P = .002) and maximal (34 +/- 7 versus 37 +/- 10, P = .005) exercise. Differences between treatment subgroups remained significant by covariate analysis; beta-blockers were also independently associated with decreased minute ventilation by multiple regression.

CONCLUSION:

Beta-blockers may be associated with increased ventilatory efficiency in CHF patients, which may contribute to improved functional class and quality of life.

PMID:
15948082
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk