Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Nature. 2005 Jun 9;435(7043):828-33.

A microRNA polycistron as a potential human oncogene.

Author information

  • 1Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Watson School of Biological Sciences, 1 Bungtown Road, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA.

Abstract

To date, more than 200 microRNAs have been described in humans; however, the precise functions of these regulatory, non-coding RNAs remains largely obscure. One cluster of microRNAs, the mir-17-92 polycistron, is located in a region of DNA that is amplified in human B-cell lymphomas. Here we compared B-cell lymphoma samples and cell lines to normal tissues, and found that the levels of the primary or mature microRNAs derived from the mir-17-92 locus are often substantially increased in these cancers. Enforced expression of the mir-17-92 cluster acted with c-myc expression to accelerate tumour development in a mouse B-cell lymphoma model. Tumours derived from haematopoietic stem cells expressing a subset of the mir-17-92 cluster and c-myc could be distinguished by an absence of apoptosis that was otherwise prevalent in c-myc-induced lymphomas. Together, these studies indicate that non-coding RNAs, specifically microRNAs, can modulate tumour formation, and implicate the mir-17-92 cluster as a potential human oncogene.

Comment in

PMID:
15944707
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk