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Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005 Jun;24(6):494-7.

Antimicrobial-resistant Shigella sonnei: limited antimicrobial treatment options for children and challenges of interpreting in vitro azithromycin susceptibility.

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  • 1Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. sjain5@jhmi.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Antimicrobial-resistant Shigella sonnei is a growing problem in the United States and poses treatment challenges particularly among children. Azithromycin is recommended as an alternative oral agent for shigellosis.

METHODS:

All isolates of Shigella submitted to Johns Hopkins clinical laboratory during the outbreak year (2002) were compared with a historical comparison group (1996-2000). Isolates were considered multiresistant if they were resistant to ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TS). Selected outbreak and reference isolates were tested for azithromycin susceptibility by E-test, disk diffusion and broth dilution methods.

RESULTS:

Between 1996-2000, among the 111 isolates submitted, 63% were from pediatric patients; 63% of isolates were resistant to ampicillin and 12% to TS. In 2002, among the 205 isolates submitted, 82% were from pediatric patients; 91% isolates were resistant to ampicillin and 67% to TS. The proportion of multiresistant isolates increased from 6% in 1996 to 65% in 2002 (P < 0.05). Azithromycin susceptibility by E-test and disk diffusion demonstrated 2 zones of inhibition for S. sonnei. Interpretation using the inner zone resulted in higher MICs (minimal inhibitory concentration) compared with the outer zones by E-test (P < 0.0001) and disk diffusion (P < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS:

With increasing interest in using azithromycin for shigellosis, clinical laboratories should be aware of the interpretation difficulty caused by the dual-zone phenomenon seen with E-test and disk diffusion methods for S. sonnei.

PMID:
15933557
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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