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Sci Total Environ. 2006 Apr 15;359(1-3):101-10.

PCB, PCDD and PCDF residues in fin and non-fin fish products from the Canadian retail market 2002.

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  • 1Food Research Division, Bureau of Chemical Safety, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada, K1A 0L2. Thea_Rawn@hc-sc.gc.ca

Abstract

Fish products (n=129) available on the Canadian retail market were collected and analyzed for levels of PCBs, PCDDs and PCDFs during the spring of 2002. The collection included samples from eight fish groups (Arctic char, crab, mussels, oysters, salmon, shrimp, tilapia, trout) from the wild and those raised on fish farms, as available. Sample collection included both domestic and imported fish products, however, no significant difference in residue levels was observed between these groups of fish products. Salmon samples were found to contain the highest concentration of sigmaPCBs (geometric mean 12.9 ng/g wet weight), while crab samples had greatest sigmaPCDD/F levels (geometric mean 0.002 ng/g wet weight). The geometric mean of the total toxic equivalents (WHO-TEQ) ranged from 0.06 pg WHO-TEQ/g whole weight in farmed shrimp to 1.1 pg WHO-TEQ/g whole weight in farmed salmon samples. PCB 153, 138, 118 and 101 were the dominant congeners observed in fish product samples studied, while 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzodioxin and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran contributed the most to total PCDD and PCDF loadings. Lipid content was positively correlated to sigmaPCB levels; however, no relationship between lipid content and sigmaPCDD/F concentrations was established. SigmaPCB levels were below the Canadian guideline value for PCBs in fish and fish products (2000 ng/g). Similarly, 2,3,7,8-TCDD levels in all fish products were below the Canadian guideline value (0.020 ng/g).

PMID:
15913708
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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