Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Oncogene. 2005 Jul 7;24(29):4728-35.

Interaction and colocalization of Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 checkpoint complex with replication protein A in human cells.

Author information

  • 1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, James H Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614, USA.

Abstract

Replication protein A (RPA) is a eukaryotic single-stranded DNA-binding protein consisting of three subunits of 70-, 32-, and 14-kDa (RPA70, RPA32, RPA14, respectively). It is a protein essential for most cellular DNA metabolic pathways. Checkpoint proteins Rad9, Rad1, and Hus1 form a clamp-like complex which plays a central role in the DNA damage-induced checkpoint response. In this report, we presented the evidence that Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex directly interacted with RPA in human cells, and this interaction was mediated by the binding of Rad9 protein to both RPA70 and RPA32 subunits. In addition, the cellular interaction of 9-1-1 with RPA or hyperphosphorylated RPA was stimulated by UV irradiation or camptothecin treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Such treatments also resulted in the colocalization of the nuclear foci formed with the two complexes. Consistently, knockdown of the RPA expression in cells by the small interference RNA (siRNA) blocked the DNA damage-dependent chromatin association of 9-1-1, and also inhibited the 9-1-1 complex formation. Taken together, our results suggest that 9-1-1 and RPA complexes collaboratively function in DNA damage responses, and that the RPA may serve as a regulator for the activity of 9-1-1 complex in the cellular checkpoint network.

PMID:
15897895
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1447597
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (5)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk