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J Neurosurg. 2005 Apr;102(3 Suppl):288-93.

Seizure outcome of lesionectomy in glioneuronal tumors associated with epilepsy in children.

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  • 1Department of Neurosciences, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, Italy. giulioni.m@tiscali.it

Abstract

OBJECT:

Glioneuronal tumors (ganglioglioma, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors [DNTs]) are commonly associated with partial seizures. The optimal surgical treatment of such tumors, however, has not been fully established; it is still unclear whether lesionectomy itself can be used to control seizures or if epileptogenic areas adjacent to the tumor should also be removed. To address this uncertainty, the authors analyzed seizure outcome in a series of children with epileptogenic glioneuronal tumors that had been treated only by lesionectomy.

METHODS:

The authors retrospectively reviewed 15 children surgically treated for glioneuronal tumors associated with epilepsy. Patients ranged in age from 3 to 18 years (mean 12.6 years); there were 12 boys and three girls. The interval between onset of seizures and surgery ranged from 0.5 to 16 years (mean 6.1 years). Ten patients (66.6%) suffered complex partial seizures and five (33.3%) simple partial seizures. Seizure frequency varied from several per day to one per month. Nine tumors (60%) were temporal and six extratemporal; in all patients resection was limited to the tumor. The follow-up duration ranged from 1 to 11 years (mean 5.6 years). Gross-total removal was achieved in 13 patients and subtotal in two. The histological diagnosis was ganglioglioma in 11 cases and DNT in four. At last follow up 13 patients (86.6%) were Engel Class I, one was Engel Class II, and one was Engel Class III.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this study indicate that lesionectomy may provide good long-term seizure control in the majority of children with epileptogenic glioneuronal tumors.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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