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Biochemistry. 2005 May 10;44(18):6971-9.

Molecular mechanism of the intracellular segments of the melanocortin-4 receptor for NDP-MSH signaling.

Author information

  • 1Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35205, USA. ying-kui.yang@ccc.uab.edu

Abstract

Mutations of the human melanocortin-4 receptor (hMC4R) have been previously identified to be the most common cause of monogenic human obesity. Specifically, mutations of the intracellular C terminus and the third intracellular loop of hMC4R have been reported to play an important role in human obesity. However, the molecular basis of these hMC4R intracellular segments in receptor function remains unclear. In this study, we utilized deletions and mutations of specific portions of the hMC4R to determine the molecular mechanism of both the C terminus and the third intracellular loop in receptor signaling. Our results indicate that deletions of the distal 25 (the entire C terminus), 22, 18, 17, 16, and 15 amino acids of the C terminus result in the complete loss of both [Nle(4)-d-Phe(7)]-alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (NDP-MSH) binding and NDP-MSH-mediated cAMP production. Deletion of the distal 14 amino acids of the C terminus significantly decreases both NDP-MSH binding affinity and potency, but deletion of the distal 13 amino acids of the C terminus does not affect NDP-MSH activity. Further analysis revealed that the proximal 12 amino acids of the C terminus are not only important for receptor signaling but also important for ligand binding. Our results also indicate that the third intracellular loop of the hMC4R is important for receptor signaling but not ligand binding. In summary, our findings suggest that the proximal region of the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) C terminus is crucial not only for receptor signaling but also for ligand binding, while the third intracellular loop is important mainly for receptor signaling.

PMID:
15865442
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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