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Transplant Proc. 2005 Mar;37(2):1207-10.

Tacrolimus for primary liver transplantation: 12 to 15 years actual follow-up with safety profile.

Author information

  • 1Strong Memorial Hospital, Department of Surgery, Transplant Division, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. Ashok_jain@urmc.Rochester.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Tacrolimus has been increasingly used for liver transplantation during the last decade. The drug has immunological advantages in short- to medium-term follow-up. However, data on longitudinal follow-up are lacking.

AIM:

The aim of the present report was to examine the impact of tacrolimus in primary adult and pediatric liver transplantation (LTx) patients.

MATERIAL AND METHOD:

One thousand consecutive primary LTx patients were performed under tacrolimus between August 1989 and December 1992 were followed up until August 2004. Mean follow-up was 13.4 +/- 0.92 (range, 11.7-15) years. There were 600 males and 400 females with a mean age of 42.6 +/- 20.2 years. There were 166 children (age 18 years or younger) and 834 adults, of whom 204 were older than 60 years (seniors).

RESULTS:

Four hundred ninety-seven (49.7%) patients died in the follow-up period. The overall 15-year actuarial patient survival rate was 51.4%. The survival rate for children was significantly better (81.3%) compared with adults (47.5%) and seniors (36.4%) (P = .0001). One hundred fifty-one patients received a second LTx, 22 patients received a third LTx, and 4 patients received a fourth LTx. Over all 15 years the actuarial graft survival rate was 46.1%. At last follow-up, 69.1% of patients were off steroids. The majority of late deaths were due to age-related complications, recurrence of disease, and De novo cancers.

CONCLUSION:

The data on longitudinal follow-up have shown actuarial survival for children to be significantly better than in adults and seniors. Graft loss from immunological causes are rare even with long-term follow-up.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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