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BMC Bioinformatics. 2005 Apr 18;6:100.

Filtering high-throughput protein-protein interaction data using a combination of genomic features.

Author information

  • 1Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. ashwini@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Protein-protein interaction data used in the creation or prediction of molecular networks is usually obtained from large scale or high-throughput experiments. This experimental data is liable to contain a large number of spurious interactions. Hence, there is a need to validate the interactions and filter out the incorrect data before using them in prediction studies.

RESULTS:

In this study, we use a combination of 3 genomic features -- structurally known interacting Pfam domains, Gene Ontology annotations and sequence homology -- as a means to assign reliability to the protein-protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae determined by high-throughput experiments. Using Bayesian network approaches, we show that protein-protein interactions from high-throughput data supported by one or more genomic features have a higher likelihood ratio and hence are more likely to be real interactions. Our method has a high sensitivity (90%) and good specificity (63%). We show that 56% of the interactions from high-throughput experiments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have high reliability. We use the method to estimate the number of true interactions in the high-throughput protein-protein interaction data sets in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens to be 27%, 18% and 68% respectively. Our results are available for searching and downloading at http://helix.protein.osaka-u.ac.jp/htp/.

CONCLUSION:

A combination of genomic features that include sequence, structure and annotation information is a good predictor of true interactions in large and noisy high-throughput data sets. The method has a very high sensitivity and good specificity and can be used to assign a likelihood ratio, corresponding to the reliability, to each interaction.

PMID:
15833142
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1127019
Free PMC Article

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