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Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Apr;11(4):533-8.

Bed bug infestations in an urban environment.

Author information

  • 1Centre for Research on Inner City Health, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. hwangs@smh.toronto.on.ca

Abstract

Until recently, bed bugs have been considered uncommon in the industrialized world. This study determined the extent of reemerging bed bug infestations in homeless shelters and other locations in Toronto, Canada. Toronto Public Health documented complaints of bed bug infestations from 46 locations in 2003, most commonly apartments (63%), shelters (15%), and rooming houses (11%). Pest control operators in Toronto (N = 34) reported treating bed bug infestations at 847 locations in 2003, most commonly single-family dwellings (70%), apartments (18%), and shelters (8%). Bed bug infestations were reported at 20 (31%) of 65 homeless shelters. At 1 affected shelter, 4% of residents reported having bed bug bites. Bed bug infestations can have an adverse effect on health and quality of life in the general population, particularly among homeless persons living in shelters.

PMID:
15829190
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3320350
Free PMC Article

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