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Blood. 2005 Aug 1;106(3):841-51. Epub 2005 Apr 12.

Preferential suppression of trisomy 8 compared with normal hematopoietic cell growth by autologous lymphocytes in patients with trisomy 8 myelodysplastic syndrome.

Author information

  • 1Hematology Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bldg 10, Rm 7C108, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. sloande@nih.gov

Abstract

Clinical observations and experimental evidence link bone marrow failure in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with a T cell-dominated autoimmune process. Immunosuppressive therapy is effective in improving cytopenias in selected patients. Trisomy 8 is a frequent cytogenetic abnormality in bone marrow cells in patients with MDS, and its presence has been associated anecdotally with good response to immunotherapy. We studied 34 patients with trisomy 8 in bone marrow cells, some of whom were undergoing treatment with antithymocyte globulin (ATG). All had significant CD8+ T-cell expansions of one or more T-cell receptor (TCR) Vbeta subfamilies, as measured by flow cytometry; expanded subfamilies showed CDR3 skewing by spectratyping. Sorted T cells of the expanded Vbeta subfamilies, but not of the remaining subfamilies, inhibited trisomy 8 cell growth in short-term hematopoietic culture. The negative effects of Vbeta-expanded T cells were inhibited by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class 1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and Fas antagonist and required direct cell-to-cell contact. Sixty-seven percent of patients who had de novo MDS with trisomy 8 as the sole karyotypic abnormality responded to ATG with durable reversal of cytopenias and restoration of transfusion independence, with stable increase in the proportion of trisomy 8 bone marrow cells and normalization of the T-cell repertoire. An increased number of T cells with apparent specificity for trisomy 8 cells is consistent with an autoimmune pathophysiology in trisomy 8 MDS.

PMID:
15827127
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1895154
Free PMC Article

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