Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Hepatol. 2005 May;42(5):752-9.

Hepatic phospholipids in alcoholic liver disease assessed by proton-decoupled 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Author information

  • 1Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Eberhard-Karls University, Tübingen, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

Alteration of the phospholipid composition of hepatic biomembranes may be one mechanism of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We applied proton-decoupled (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ({(1)H}-(31)P MRSI) to 40 patients with ALD and to 13 healthy controls to confirm that metabolic alterations in hepatic phospholipid intermediates could be detected non-invasively.

METHODS:

All patients underwent liver biopsy. Specimens were scored in non-cirrhosis [fatty liver (n=3), alcoholic hepatitis (n=2), fibrosis (n=4), alcoholic hepatitis plus fibrosis (n=16)], and cirrhosis (n=15). {(1)H}-(31)P spectra were collected on a clinical 1.5-Tesla MR system and were evaluated by calculating signal intensity ratios of hepatic phosphomonoester (PME), phosphodiester (PDE), phosphoethanolamine (PE), phosphocholine (PC), glycerophosphorylethanolamine (GPE), and glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC) resonances.

RESULTS:

The signal intensity ratio GPE/GPC was significantly elevated in cirrhotic (1.19+/-0.22; P=0.002) and non-cirrhotic ALD patients (1.01+/-0.13; P=0.006) compared to healthy controls (0.68+/-0.04), while PE/PC and PME/PDE were significantly elevated in cirrhotic ALD patients compared to controls (1.68+/-0.60 vs. 0.97+/-0.31; P=0.02, and 0.38+/-0.02 vs. 0.25+/-0.01; P=0.002, respectively) and non-cirrhotic patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

The data support that {(1)H}-(31)P MRSI appears to distinguish cirrhotic from non-cirrhotic ALD patients and confirms changes in hepatic phospholipid metabolism observed in an animal model.

PMID:
15826726
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk