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Infect Immun. 2005 Apr;73(4):2157-63.

Lipopolysaccharide preparation extracted from Porphyromonas gingivalis lipoprotein-deficient mutant shows a marked decrease in toll-like receptor 2-mediated signaling.

Author information

  • 1Department of Oral Microbiology, Asahi University School of Dentistry, 1851-1 Hozumi, Mizuho, Gifu 501-0296, Japan.

Abstract

We recently demonstrated that a new PG1828-encoded lipoprotein (PG1828LP) was able to be separated from a Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preparation, and we found that it exhibited strong cell activation, similar to that of Escherichia coli LPS, through a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent pathway. In order to determine the virulence of PG1828LP toward cell activation, we generated a PG1828-deficient mutant of P. gingivalis strain 381 by allelic exchange mutagenesis using an ermF-ermAM antibiotic resistance cassette. A highly purified preparation of LPS from a PG1828-deficient mutant (DeltaPG1828-LPS) showed nearly the same ladder-like patterns in silver-stained gels as a preparation of LPS from a wild-type strain (WT-LPS), as well as Limulus amoebocyte lysate activities that were similar to those of the WT-LPS preparation. However, the ability of the DeltaPG1828-LPS preparation to activate NF-kappaB in TLR2-expressing cells was markedly attenuated. Cytokine production by human gingival fibroblasts was also decreased in response to the DeltaPG1828-LPS preparation in comparison with the WT-LPS preparation, and the activity was comparable to the stimulation of highly purified lipid A of P. gingivalis by TLR4. Further, lethal toxicity was rarely observed following intraperitoneal injection of the PG1828-deficient mutant into mice compared to that with the wild-type strain, while the DeltaPG1828-LPS preparation showed no lethal toxicity. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that PG1828LP plays an essential role in inflammatory responses and may be a major virulence factor of P. gingivalis.

PMID:
15784558
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1087447
Free PMC Article

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