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Biol Psychiatry. 2005 Mar 15;57(6):594-608.

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol effects in schizophrenia: implications for cognition, psychosis, and addiction.

Author information

  • 1Schizophrenia Biological Research Center, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT 06516, USA. deepak.dsouza@yale.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent advances in the neurobiology of cannabinoids have renewed interest in the association between cannabis and psychotic disorders.

METHODS:

In a 3-day, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, the behavioral, cognitive, motor, and endocrine effects of 0 mg, 2.5 mg, and 5 mg intravenous Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9-THC) were characterized in 13 stable, antipsychotic-treated schizophrenia patients. These data were compared with effects in healthy subjects reported elsewhere.

RESULTS:

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol transiently increased 1) learning and recall deficits; 2) positive, negative, and general schizophrenia symptoms; 3) perceptual alterations; 4) akathisia, rigidity, and dyskinesia; 5) deficits in vigilance; and 6) plasma prolactin and cortisol. Schizophrenia patients were more vulnerable to Delta-9-THC effects on recall relative to control subjects. There were no serious short- or long-term adverse events associated with study participation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol is associated with transient exacerbation in core psychotic and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. These data do not provide a reason to explain why schizophrenia patients use or misuse cannabis. Furthermore, Delta-9-THC might differentially affect schizophrenia patients relative to control subjects. Finally, the enhanced sensitivity to the cognitive effects of Delta-9-THC warrants further study into whether brain cannabinoid receptor dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of the cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia.

PMID:
15780846
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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