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Am J Prev Med. 2005 Apr;28(3):285-90.

Multicomponent Internet continuing medical education to promote chlamydia screening.

Author information

  • 1Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 720 Faculty Office Tower, 1530 3rd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294-3407, USA. jallison@uab.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Low Chlamydia trachomatis screening rates create an opportunity to test innovative continuing medical education (CME) programs. Few studies of Internet-based physician learning have been evaluated with objective data on practice patterns.

DESIGN:

This randomized controlled trial tested a multicomponent Internet CME (mCME) intervention for increasing chlamydia screening of at-risk women aged 16 to 26 years.

SETTING:

Eligible physician offices had > or =20 patients at risk for chlamydia as defined by the Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS), had at least one primary care physician (internal medicine, family medicine/general practice, pediatrics) with Internet access, and participated in the study managed care organization. The 191 randomized primary care offices represented 20 states.

INTERVENTION:

The intervention, available from February to December 2001, consisted of four case-based learning modules, was tailored in real time to each physician based on theory of behavior change, and included office-level feedback of chlamydia screening rates.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

HEDIS chlamydia screening rates for the pre-intervention (2000) and post-intervention (2002) periods.

RESULTS:

Pre-intervention screening rates for the intervention and comparison offices were 18.9% and 16.2% (p =0.135). Post-intervention screening rates for the intervention and comparison offices were 15.5% and 12.4%, respectively (p =0.044, adjusting for baseline performance).

CONCLUSIONS:

The substantial decline in chlamydia screening rates observed in the comparison offices was significantly attenuated for the intervention offices. The mCME favorably influenced chlamydia screening by primary care physicians.

PMID:
15766617
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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