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Biosens Bioelectron. 2005 Apr 15;20(10):1897-902.

In vivo glucose monitoring: the clinical reality and the promise.

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  • 1Metabolic Unit, Guy's, King's and St Thomas's School of Medicine, Guy's Hospital, 5th Floor Thomas Guy House, London SE1 9RT, UK. john.pickup@kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

Glucose monitoring is an essential component of modern diabetes management. Three in vivo glucose sensors are now available for clinical use: a subcutaneously implanted amperometric enzyme electrode, a reverse iontophoresis system and a microdialysis-based device. Improvements in glucose-sensing technology continue to be sought, e.g. wired enzyme technology, viscometric affinity sensing and totally implanted glucose sensors. Non-invasive glucose sensing is the ultimate goal of glucose monitoring, but the most investigated approach, near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, is presently too imprecise for clinical application. Fluorescence-based glucose sensing offers several advantages and we are investigating strategies which include NIR-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer using concanavalin A/dextran; changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of hexokinase encapsulated in sol-gel; and non-invasive glucose monitoring of cells by measuring glucose-related changes in NADP(H).

PMID:
15741056
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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