Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2005 May;179(2):437-46. Epub 2005 Mar 1.

Differential cognitive effects of Ginkgo biloba after acute and chronic treatment in healthy young volunteers.

Author information

  • 1Psychopharmacology Research Unit, Centre for Neuroscience, Hodgkin Building, King's College London, Guy's Campus, London, SE1 1UL, UK. sarah.elsabagh@kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Acute doses of Ginkgo biloba have been shown to improve attention and memory in young, healthy participants, but there has been a lack of investigation into possible effects on executive function. In addition, only one study has investigated the effects of chronic treatment in young volunteers.

OBJECTIVES:

This study was conducted to compare the effects of ginkgo after acute and chronic treatment on tests of attention, memory and executive function in healthy university students.

METHODS:

Using a placebo-controlled double-blind design, in experiment 1, 52 students were randomly allocated to receive a single dose of ginkgo (120 mg, n=26) or placebo (n=26), and were tested 4 h later. In experiment 2, 40 students were randomly allocated to receive ginkgo (120 mg/day; n=20) or placebo (n=20) for a 6-week period and were tested at baseline and after 6 weeks of treatment. In both experiments, participants underwent tests of sustained attention, episodic and working memory, mental flexibility and planning, and completed mood rating scales.

RESULTS:

The acute dose of ginkgo significantly improved performance on the sustained-attention task and pattern-recognition memory task; however, there were no effects on working memory, planning, mental flexibility or mood. After 6 weeks of treatment, there were no significant effects of ginkgo on mood or any of the cognitive tests.

CONCLUSIONS:

In line with the literature, after acute administration ginkgo improved performance in tests of attention and memory. However, there were no effects after 6 weeks, suggesting that tolerance develops to the effects in young, healthy participants.

PMID:
15739076
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk