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Neuroimage. 2005 Mar;25(1):312-9. Epub 2005 Jan 21.

Viewing facial expressions of pain engages cortical areas involved in the direct experience of pain.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, PA 19104-6241, USA. mmb@mail.med.upenn.edu

Abstract

Recent neuroimaging and neuropsychological work has begun to shed light on how the brain responds to the viewing of facial expressions of emotion. However, one important category of facial expression that has not been studied on this level is the facial expression of pain. We investigated the neural response to pain expressions by performing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as subjects viewed short video sequences showing faces expressing either moderate pain or, for comparison, no pain. In alternate blocks, the same subjects received both painful and non-painful thermal stimulation. Facial expressions of pain were found to engage cortical areas also engaged by the first-hand experience of pain, including anterior cingulate cortex and insula. The reported findings corroborate other work in which the neural response to witnessed pain has been examined from other perspectives. In addition, they lend support to the idea that common neural substrates are involved in representing one's own and others' affective states.

PMID:
15734365
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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