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Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2005 Jul;180(2):306-15. Epub 2005 Feb 18.

Reduced nicotine reward in obesity: cross-comparison in human and mouse.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pharmacology, 125 John Morgan Building, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6084, USA. blendy@pharm.med.upenn.edu

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Tobacco use and obesity lead to significant morbidity and mortality.

OBJECTIVE:

This study was conducted to investigate the factors maintaining smoking behavior in lean and obese individuals by utilizing a mouse/human cross-validation model of nicotine reward.

METHODS:

In humans, a cigarette choice paradigm was used to examine the relative reinforcing value of nicotine in obese and non-obese smokers. Conditioned place preference (CPP) for nicotine was assessed in mice fed standard low fat rodent chow and mice rendered obese by a high fat diet.

RESULTS:

In humans, obese smokers self-administered nicotine via cigarettes significantly less often than non-obese smokers and showed attenuated hedonic effects of nicotine-containing cigarettes compared to denicotinized cigarettes. Similarly, mice exposed to a high fat diet did not exhibit nicotine CPP, relative to control mice. mRNA levels for mu-opiate and leptin receptors were also downregulated in the ventral tegmental area of these mice.

CONCLUSIONS:

Together, these studies provide the first evidence for reduced nicotine reward in obese subjects and suggest that this may be mediated by dietary influences on the endogenous opioid system.

PMID:
15719224
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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