Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Mar 1;135(5):477-89.

Risk factors for fractures of the distal forearm and proximal humerus. The Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Research Group.

Author information

  • 1Division of Epidemiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305-5092.

Erratum in

  • Am J Epidemiol 1992 May 15;135(10):1183.

Abstract

The Study of Osteoporotic Fractures is a prospective cohort study begun in 1986 that includes 9,704 women aged 65 years and older from Maryland, Minnesota, Oregon, and Pennsylvania. A total of 171 women suffered fractures of the distal forearm, and 79 women had fractures of the proximal humerus during the first 2.2 years of follow-up. Most fractures at both sites occurred as a result of a fall. Low bone mineral density was a strong predictor of these fractures; comparing those in the lowest quintile of bone mineral density in the distal radius with those in the highest quintile, the rate ratio was 4.1 for fractures of the distal forearm and 7.5 for fractures of the proximal humerus. Other factors associated with an increased rate of distal forearm fracture independently of low bone mineral density included poor visual acuity, number of falls in the year before baseline, and frequent walking. Factors that appeared to be independently associated with an increased rate of fracture of the proximal humerus included a recent decline in health status, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, infrequent walking, and several indicators of neuromuscular weakness such as inability to stand with feet in a tandem position for more than a few seconds. These data support the hypothesis that distal forearm fractures often occur as a result of a fall in women with low bone mineral density who are relatively healthy and active and have good neuromuscular function, while fractures of the proximal humerus tend to occur as a result of a fall in women with low bone mineral density who are less healthy and less active than average and who have poor neuromuscular function.

PMID:
1570814
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk