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Public Health Nutr. 2005 Feb;8(1):53-60.

Diabetes and hypertension increases in a society with abdominal obesity: results of the Mexican National Health Survey 2000.

Author information

  • 1Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Dirección de Nutrición, Departamento de Fisiología de la Nutrición, Tlalpan, México. kailas@prodigy.net.mx

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the prevalences of overweight, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HT) in the Mexican population and compare them with those of a previous Mexican urban survey and an American survey.

DESIGN:

A structured, randomised, nationally representative Mexican sample was compared with a 1993 Mexican urban survey and the US Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) of non-Hispanic Whites.

SETTING:

The Mexican National Health Survey 2000.Subjects: Subjects were 12,856 men and 28,332 women, aged 20-69 years, who had their body weight, height, waist circumference (WC), blood pressure and fasting capillary blood glucose measured.

RESULTS:

Mexican adult men and women had a high prevalence of overweight (41.3 and 36.3%, respectively) and obesity (19.4 and 29.0%, respectively), similar to those in the USA in 1988-1992 and exceeding those of the 1993 Mexican survey. The prevalence of HT was 33.3% in men and 25.6% in women, with inferred DM rates of 5.6 and 9.7%, respectively. Abdominal obesity affected 46.3% of men (WC>or=94 cm) and 81.4% of women (WC>or=80 cm). There was a high prevalence of abdominal obesity in normal-weight women, with co-morbidities relating better to WC than to body mass index (BMI) in both sexes. Rates of DM and HT exceeded US rates on a comparable BMI or WC basis in adults aged <50 years.

CONCLUSION:

The high prevalence of obesity and abdominal obesity in Mexicans is associated with markedly increased prevalences of DM and HT to levels comparable with, or even higher than, those in NHANES III of non-Hispanic Whites.

PMID:
15707539
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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