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Biol Psychiatry. 2005 Feb 15;57(4):343-50.

Antidepressant-like effects of uridine and omega-3 fatty acids are potentiated by combined treatment in rats.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, McLean Hospital, Belmont, Massachusetts, USA. carlezon@mclean.harvard.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Brain phospholipid metabolism and membrane fluidity may be involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. We showed previously that cytidine, which increases phospholipid synthesis, has antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test (FST) in rats, a model used in depression research. Because cytidine and uridine both stimulate synthesis of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline, a critical substrate for phospholipid synthesis), we examined whether uridine would also produce antidepressant-like effects in rats. We also examined the effects of omega-3 fatty acids (OMG), which increase membrane fluidity and reportedly have antidepressant effects in humans, alone and in combination with uridine.

METHODS:

We first examined the effects of uridine injections alone and dietary supplementation with OMG alone in the FST. We then combined sub-effective treatment regimens of uridine and OMG to determine whether these agents would be more effective if administered together.

RESULTS:

Uridine dose-dependently reduced immobility in the FST, an antidepressant-like effect. Dietary supplementation with OMG reduced immobility when given for 30 days, but not for 3 or 10 days. A sub-effective dose of uridine reduced immobility in rats given sub-effective dietary supplementation with OMG.

CONCLUSIONS:

Uridine and OMG each have antidepressant-like effects in rats. Less of each agent is required for effectiveness when the treatments are administered together.

PMID:
15705349
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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