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Development. 2005 Mar;132(5):941-52. Epub 2005 Jan 26.

Peripheral nerve-derived VEGF promotes arterial differentiation via neuropilin 1-mediated positive feedback.

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  • 1Division of Biology 216-76, California Institute of Technology, 1201 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA.

Abstract

In developing limb skin, peripheral nerves are required for arterial differentiation, and guide the pattern of arterial branching. In vitro experiments suggest that nerve-derived VEGF may be important for arteriogenesis, but its role in vivo remains unclear. Using a series of nerve-specific Cre lines, we show that VEGF derived from sensory neurons, motoneurons and/or Schwann cells is required for arteriogenesis in vivo. Arteriogenesis also requires endothelial expression of NRP1, an artery-specific coreceptor for VEGF(164) that is itself induced by VEGF. Our results provide the first evidence that VEGF is necessary for arteriogenesis from a primitive capillary plexus in vivo, and show that in limb skin the nerve is indeed the principal source of this signal. They also suggest a model in which a 'winner-takes-all' competition for VEGF may control arterial differentiation, with the outcome biased by a VEGF(164)-NRP1 positive-feedback loop. Our results also demonstrate that nerve-vessel alignment is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for nerve-induced arteriogenesis. Different mechanisms therefore probably underlie these endothelial patterning and differentiation processes.

PMID:
15673567
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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