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J Adolesc Health. 2005 Jan;36(1):70.e1-6.

Internet-administered adolescent health questionnaires compared with a paper version in a randomized study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. r.mangunkusumo@erasmusmc.nl

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess whether the scores of an Internet-administered adolescent health questionnaire (using two different interfaces) are equivalent to those obtained via paper and pencil (P&P). Furthermore, it compares adolescents' evaluations of modes of administration.

METHODS:

We randomly assigned 591 adolescents (aged 13-17 years) from five secondary schools within their classes to one of the two Internet interfaces (multiple items vs. one item per screen) or P&P. Adolescents completed questionnaires on psychosocial well-being (KIVPA), self-reported problems, health care utilization, and health-related behavior and supplementary evaluation surveys (on the given health questionnaire mode) in the computer classrooms. Differences in questionnaire scores among administration modes were analyzed by the Student's t-test and Wald test.

RESULTS:

Response rate was 96% (n = 565). Adolescents in the Internet one-item mode more frequently reported satisfaction with appearance compared with the Internet multiple-items mode (p </= .01). The Internet group had more adolescents reporting that they have a sufficient number of friends than those in the paper mode (p </= .01). The Internet mode received more favorable evaluations than P&P. The multiple items per screen format was favored over the one item per screen format on perceived speed of the administration mode.

CONCLUSIONS:

Health questionnaires via Internet were positively evaluated and generally resulted in equal scores of health status/health behavior compared with the P&P mode. We recommend further research with other questionnaires, and in other settings as well with regard to score equivalence between web-based and P&P-administered questionnaires.

PMID:
15661601
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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