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Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2004 Dec;1030:612-21.

Repetitive treatments of colon HT-29 cells with diallyl disulfide induce a prolonged hyperacetylation of histone H3 K14.

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  • 1Laboratoire de Nutrition et Sécurité Alimentaire, Institut National de al Recherche Agronomique, 78352 Jouy-en-Josas cedex, France. druesne@jouy.inra.fr

Abstract

Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a sulfur compound derived from garlic. Several studies carried out in rodents have revealed protective effects of DADS against colon carcinogenesis. The antipromoting effects of DADS may be partly related to its ability to inhibit tumoral cell proliferation. In a previous study, we have shown that in two human colon tumor cell lines (HT-29 and Caco-2) seeded at a low density (0.2 x 10(6) cells/100-mm petri dish), DADS antiproliferative effects were associated with a transient increase of histone H3 K14 acetylation. Moreover, DADS could inhibit nuclear histone deacetylase activity. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the possible effects of different experimental conditions (HT-29 cells at high density, repetitive treatments with DADS) on the pattern of DADS-induced histone hyperacetylation. Using HT-29 cells seeded at a higher density (5 x 10(6) cells/100-mm petri dish), we found that DADS induced histone H3 K14 hyperacetylation rapidly (3 h). When administrated as single treatments, the DADS effect on histone H3 K14 remained transient. In contrast, repetitive treatment with DADS resulted in a prolonged hyperacetylation of histone H3 K14. Whatever the cell culture conditions were, DADS had no effect on histone H4 acetylation. Thus, in vitro, the cell density and pattern of DADS treatment influenced the HT-29 nuclear response to DADS. DADS belongs to food-borne molecules that may play a role in chromatin remodeling and contribute to the nutritional modulation of gene expression.

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