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Magy Onkol. 2004;48(4):315-21. Epub 2005 Jan 17.

[Dual tumours in the GI tract: synchronous and metachronous stromal (GIST) and epithelial/neuroendocrine neoplasms].

[Article in Hungarian]

Author information

  • 1Baranya Megyei Kórház, Pécs 7623, Hungary. yst@pathology.pote.hu

Abstract

Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) constitute the most frequent group of mesenchymal tumours in the gastrointestinal tract (GI). During the last several decades major advances have been taken in the diagnostics, treatment, and understanding of its pathogenesis. However, much less is known about the either metachronous or synchronous concurrence of GIST and other tumours of different histogenesis. In the present study clinicopathological data of 43 patients with histologically proved gastrointestinal stromal tumour were studied mainly in regard of the occurrence of a secondary neoplasm. Among the 43, 7 cases were found with secondary tumour mainly of epithelial origin. In three cases (cases 3, 5, and 7) GIST concurred with colorectal adenocarcinoma, in one case (case 1) GIST occurred in a patient with a 3-years-history of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), in other two (cases 2 and 4) the stromal tumour was combined with in situ adenocarcinoma of the stomach and carcinoid of the pancreas, respectively. In case 6, GIST concurred with a duodenal Brunner gland adenoma. In five cases the stromal tumour and the other neoplasm occurred synchronously, and in four of them, being the stromal tumour clinically silent, GISTs were intraoperative findings. This confirms the importance of surgical intraabdominal control before closure. In one hand the repeated concurrence of GIST and colorectal adenocarcinoma in our series, and on the other hand, that of GIST and adenocarcinoma of the stomach in the literature, may indicate an at least partly common factor, which may be involved in the pathogenesis of these neoplasms.

PMID:
15655577
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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