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J Chem Phys. 2004 Dec 8;121(22):10945-56.

Exact decoupling of the Dirac Hamiltonian. II. The generalized Douglas-Kroll-Hess transformation up to arbitrary order.

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  • 1Lehrstuhl für Theoretische Chemie, Universität Bonn, Wegelerstrasse 12, D-53115 Bonn, Germany. reiher@thch.uni-bonn.de

Abstract

In order to achieve exact decoupling of the Dirac Hamiltonian within a unitary transformation scheme, we have discussed in part I of this series that either a purely numerical iterative technique (the Barysz-Sadlej-Snijders method) or a stepwise analytic approach (the Douglas-Kroll-Hess method) are possible. For the evaluation of Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonians up to a pre-defined order it was shown that a symbolic scheme has to be employed. In this work, an algorithm for this analytic derivation of Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonians up to any arbitrary order in the external potential is presented. We discuss how an estimate for the necessary order for exact decoupling (within machine precision) for a given system can be determined from the convergence behavior of the Douglas-Kroll-Hess expansion prior to a quantum chemical calculation. Once this maximum order has been accomplished, the spectrum of the positive-energy part of the decoupled Hamiltonian, e.g., for electronic bound states, cannot be distinguished from the corresponding part of the spectrum of the Dirac operator. An efficient scalar-relativistic implementation of the symbolic operations for the evaluation of the positive-energy part of the block-diagonal Hamiltonian is presented, and its accuracy is tested for ground-state energies of one-electron ions over the whole periodic table. Furthermore, the first many-electron calculations employing sixth up to fourteenth order DKH Hamiltonians are presented.

(c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

PMID:
15634044
[PubMed]
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