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Arch Dermatol. 2004 Dec;140(12):1471-5.

Fewer melanocytic nevi found in children with active atopic dermatitis than in children without dermatitis.

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  • 1Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of Dermatology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Link√∂ping, Link√∂ping, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the effects of atopic diseases on nevus development during childhood.

DESIGN:

A descriptive survey of nevi in a cohort of 8- and 9-year-old children combining a skin examination and a validated questionnaire regarding atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and bronchial asthma.

SETTING:

Fifty-one primary schools in Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 788 children born in 1992 participated in 1999 in a prevalence study of allergic diseases. The present study was restricted to the 545 children from that study who were still living in the community, and 515 (94%) of them participated. The cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and bronchial asthma was 24%, 12%, and 13%, respectively, from birth to age 7 years as reported by questionnaire; 3% reported all 3 diagnoses.

RESULTS:

Children with reported atopic dermatitis and findings of active dermatitis on examination had fewer nevi (median, 4; mean, 7.4) than children with no reported atopic disease and no active dermatitis found on examination (median, 9; mean, 11.2) (P<.001). Children who developed active atopic dermatitis after the questionnaire was filled out (ie, during the last 2 years) had fewer nevi than children with no atopic disease (median, 3; mean, 5.3) (P<.001). There was no difference in nevus number between the children with bronchial asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and children with no atopic disease.

CONCLUSION:

Children with atopic dermatitis had few melanocytic nevi, which suggests that the proinflammatory cytokine network in the atopic skin might inhibit melanocyte growth and/or progression to nevi.

PMID:
15611424
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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