Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Oct;46(10):1041-7.

Predicting the two-year course of unexplained fatigue and the onset of long-term sickness absence in fatigued employees: results from the Maastricht Cohort Study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medical, Clinical and Experimental Psychology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. m.huibers@dmkep.unimaas.nl

Abstract

Because of the serious adverse consequences of unexplained fatigue, it is important to identify factors that determine the prognosis of unexplained fatigue and the onset of long-term sickness absence in fatigued employees. Analyses were based on the Maastricht Cohort Study, a prospective population-based cohort study among more than 12,000 employees. Severely fatigued employees who were not on sick leave (n = 2108) were selected at baseline and followed up at six time points during the course of 2 years. Point prevalences of severe fatigue (59% to 63%) and long-term sickness absence (1.8% to 3.1%) among participants were fairly stable at all consecutive time points. Lower levels of fatigue severity, work-related exhaustion and anxious mood, absence of conflicts with colleagues, and good self-rated health at baseline were predictors of the onset of recovery from fatigue in survival analyses. Older age, low decision authority, female sex, working in nightshift, a physical attribution of fatigue, and a history of absenteeism were predictors of the onset of long-term absenteeism. The course of unexplained fatigue in employees is characterized by remission and relapse in time while the absolute risk of long-term absenteeism is small. Given the broad range of predictors, it appears that fatigue and long-term sickness absence entangle different underlying processes. Our findings underscore the notion that prevention and treatment of fatigue should be aimed at health perception and emotional well-being.

PMID:
15602178
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk