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Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Dec;61(12):1226-33.

Immigration and lifetime prevalence of DSM-IV psychiatric disorders among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites in the United States: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

Author information

  • 1Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biometry, Division of Intramural Clinical and Biological Research, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, DHHS, Bethesda, MD 20892-9304, USA. bgrant@willco.niaaa.nih.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There exist no national prevalence data on specific DSM-IV Axis I psychiatric disorders among foreign-born and US-born Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites.

OBJECTIVE:

To present nationally representative data on the prevalence of DSM-IV lifetime psychiatric disorders among foreign-born and US-born Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites.

DESIGN:

Face-to-face survey conducted in the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

SETTING:

The United States and District of Columbia, including Alaska and Hawaii.

PARTICIPANTS:

Household and group-quarters residents, aged 18 years and older (n = 43 093).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Prevalence of DSM-IV substance use disorders and mood and anxiety disorders.

RESULTS:

With few exceptions, foreign-born Mexican Americans and foreign-born non-Hispanic whites were at significantly lower risk (P<.05) of DSM-IV substance use and mood and anxiety disorders compared with their US-born counterparts. Although the risk of specific psychiatric disorders was similar between foreign-born Mexican Americans and foreign-born non-Hispanic whites, US-born Mexican Americans were at significantly lower risk (P<.05) of psychiatric morbidity than US-born non-Hispanic whites.

CONCLUSIONS:

Data favoring foreign-born Mexican Americans with respect to mental health may extend to foreign-born non-Hispanic whites. Future research among foreign-born and US-born Mexican Americans and the foreign-born and US-born of other origins and descents is needed to understand what appears to be the protective effects of culture and the deleterious effects of acculturation on psychiatric morbidity in the United States.

PMID:
15583114
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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