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Psychiatr Genet. 2004 Dec;14(4):227-31.

Genetic analysis of the thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase variant in schizophrenia and mood disorders.

Author information

  • 1Defence Medical Research Institute, Defence Science and Technology Agency, Republic of Singapore. tenechoo@dso.org.sg

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

An elevated homocysteine level has been reported for patients with schizophrenia and depression. We investigated the frequency of the common C667 T variant of the enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in controls and patients of Chinese descent.

METHODS:

Controls with no history of mental disorder and patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar and unipolar disorders were recruited. Genomic DNA from all were genotyped for the C667 T polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism.

RESULTS:

There was no significant difference in genotype distributions or allele frequencies between controls and any of the diagnostic groups, although the frequency of the T allele was higher for all diagnostic groups and for both the male and female genders. When data was analyzed with the minor T allele as dominant, there was an excess of the T-containing genotypes in each of the patient groups compared with controls. For the difference between controls and all cases combined it almost reached statistical significance (P=0.077), with an odds ratio of 1.46 (95% confidence interval, 0.96-2.22).

CONCLUSIONS:

Although there was no significant association as measured by the P value, the odds ratio and confidence interval provided some evidence of increased risk for individuals with the T-containing genotypes. A minor role for this polymorphism in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and depression could not be ruled out and would warrant further investigation.

PMID:
15564899
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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