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J Am Soc Nephrol. 2005 Jan;16(1):144-50. Epub 2004 Nov 24.

Pyridoxal phosphate and hepatocyte growth factor prevent dialysate-induced peritoneal damage.

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  • 1Department of Clinical Preventive Medicine, Nagoya University Hospital, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8560, Japan.

Abstract

Glucose-based peritoneal dialysate (PD) is responsible for increased accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) in the peritoneum of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), a derivative of vitamin B(6), protects proteins from glycation. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) heals damaged tissues in a reciprocal manner against TGF-beta1. First, with the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, whether PLP traps 3-deoxyglucosone (3DG), a major glucose degradation product in PD, was determined. Then, whether rat peritoneal tissue damages induced by intraperitoneal administration of glucose-based PD is ameliorated by PLP or HGF was examined. In vitro incubation with PLP markedly decreased concentration of 3DG in a dose-dependent manner, demonstrating the 3DG-trapping effect of PLP. The peritoneum of PD-treated rats was significantly thickened compared with that of physiologic saline-treated rats. Both PLP and HGF prevented the thickening of rat peritoneum induced by PD and ameliorated accumulation of AGE and expression of TGF-beta1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and type 1 collagen and a number of blood vessels. Furthermore, expression of HGF was significantly increased in the peritoneum of PLP-treated rats compared with that of PD-treated rats. In conclusion, PLP shows 3DG-trapping effect. PLP and HGF prevented peritoneal thickening; accumulation of AGE; expression of TGF-beta1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and type 1 collagen; and neoangiogenesis in rat peritoneum induced by PD.

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