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Prev Med. 2004 Dec;39(6):1080-6.

Influence of demographic, physiologic, and psychosocial variables on adherence to a yearlong moderate-intensity exercise trial in postmenopausal women.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8034, USA. melinda.irwin@yale.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Few studies have examined the long-term adherence to a yearlong exercise intervention among postmenopausal women. We examined the patterns of adherence to a yearlong exercise intervention and the influence of demographic, physiologic, and psychosocial variables on patterns of adherence among 173 sedentary, overweight, postmenopausal women.

METHODS:

We collected demographic, physical activity (PA), physiologic, psychosocial, and medical history information at baseline and 12 months. The exercise prescription consisted of at least 45 min of moderate-intensity exercise 5 days/week for 12 months. We calculated several adherence variables. Associations between baseline variables and adherence levels were assessed in bivariate analyses and in multiple regression models.

RESULTS:

Women randomized to the exercise group (N = 87) participated in moderate-intensity sports or recreational PA on 3.7 +/- 1.4 days/week (79% of the prescribed 5 days/week) for 171 +/- 88 min/week (87% of the prescribed 225 min/week) over the yearlong trial period. Sixty-eight percent of the exercisers had a yearlong average PA level exceeding the national recommendation of 150 min/week. Being in the preparation stage vs. the contemplation stage of the transtheoretical model and a history of participating in any sports or recreational PA were significant predictors of adherence.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings provide important information for the design of future PA interventions and health promotion programs.

PMID:
15539040
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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