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Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2004 Nov;(428):74-81.

Minimally invasive total knee replacement through a mini-midvastus incision: an outcome study.

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  • 1Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY 10021, USA. Laskinr@aol.com

Abstract

Total knee replacement traditionally has been done through an anterior incision approximately 18 cm long, using a capsular incision that separates the interval between the rectus femoris and vastus medialis musculature. Although giving excellent exposure, this incision also disrupts the suprapatellar pouch and may lead to adhesions and difficulty with rapidly regaining flexion. It is hypothesized that, by using a more minimally invasive incision, there will be a more rapid return of flexion and the patient will require fewer narcotic medications postoperatively. This retrospective review compared 32 total knee replacements done through a minimally invasive mini-midvastus approach with 26 total knee replacements done through the standard medial parapatellar approach. Preoperative Knee Society scores and postoperative functional outcomes were compared. Postoperative flexion was measured daily during hospitalization and at a 6-week and 3-month followup. Pain was assessed by a visual analog scale and the amount of pain medication used during hospitalization. Implant position was measured. The MIS group had an average skin incision length of 12.8 cm. Passive flexion on a daily basis was significantly higher in the MIS group compared with the standard group. At 6 weeks postoperatively, the change in Knee Score was statistically higher in the MIS group and the average visual analog pain score and the total amount of pain medication was lower. The radiographic alignment and position of all the components was normal in all patients in both groups. The limited disruption of the extensor mechanism results in more rapid restoration of the quadriceps muscle control.

PMID:
15534522
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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