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Mol Biochem Parasitol. 2004 Nov;138(1):97-106.

Shotgun optical mapping of the entire Leishmania major Friedlin genome.

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  • 1Laboratory for Molecular and Computational Genomics, UW Biotechnology Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 425 Henry Mall, Madison, WI 53706, USA.

Abstract

Leishmania is a group of protozoan parasites which causes a broad spectrum of diseases resulting in widespread human suffering and death, as well as economic loss from the infection of some domestic animals and wildlife. To further understand the fundamental genomic architecture of this parasite, and to accelerate the on-going sequencing project, a whole-genome XbaI restriction map was constructed using the optical mapping system. This map supplemented traditional physical maps that were generated by fingerprinting and hybridization of cosmid and P1 clone libraries. Thirty-six optical map contigs were constructed for the corresponding known 36 chromosomes of the Leishmania major Friedlin genome. The chromosome sizes ranged from 326.9 to 2821.3 kb, with a total genome size of 34.7 Mb; the average XbaI restriction fragment was 25.3 kb, and ranged from 15.7 to 77.8 kb on a per chromosomes basis. Comparison between the optical maps and the in silico maps of sequence drawn from completed, nearly finished, or large sequence contigs showed that optical maps served several useful functions within the path to create finished sequence by: guiding aspects of the sequence assembly, identifying misassemblies, detection of cosmid or PAC clones misplacements to chromosomes, and validation of sequence stemming from varying degrees of finishing. Our results also showed the potential use of optical maps as a means to detect and characterize map segmental duplication within genomes.

PMID:
15500921
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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