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Cell Signal. 2005 Feb;17(2):263-77.

c-Src is involved in regulating signal transmission from PDGFbeta receptor-GPCR(s) complexes in mammalian cells.

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  • 1Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Strathclyde Institute for Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 27 Taylor St., Glasgow G4 ONR, UK.

Abstract

We have reported that the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta (PDGFbeta) forms a novel signaling complex with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) (e.g. S1P(1) receptor) that enables more efficient activation of p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in response to PDGF and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). We now demonstrate that c-Src participates in regulating the endocytosis of PDGFbeta receptor-GPCR complexes in response to PDGF. This leads to association of cytoplasmic p42/p44 MAPK with the receptor complex in endocytic vesicles. c-Src is regulated by G protein betagamma subunits and can interact with beta-arrestin. Indeed, the PDGF-dependent activation of p42/p44 MAPK was reduced by over-expression of the C-terminal domain of GRK2 (sequesters Gbetagamma subunits), the clathrin-binding domain of beta-arrestin and by inhibitors of c-Src and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Moreover, PDGF and S1P induce the recruitment of c-Src to the PDGFbeta receptor-S1P(1) receptor complex. This leads to a G protein/c-Src-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of Gab1 and accumulation of dynamin II at the plasma membrane, a step required for endocytosis of the PDGFbeta receptor-GPCR complex. These findings provide important information concerning the molecular organisation of novel receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-GPCR signal relays in mammalian cells.

PMID:
15494217
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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