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Arch Intern Med. 2004 Oct 11;164(18):2038-43.

Comprehensive strategy to prevent nosocomial spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a highly endemic setting.

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  • 1University Clinic of Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, Golnik, Slovenia. viktorija.tomic@klinika-golnik.si

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The effectiveness and feasibility of a comprehensive strategy to reduce nosocomial transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a highly endemic setting have not yet been proved. Limited benefits and the high cost of such programs are the main concerns.

METHODS:

We prospectively evaluated the effect of an aggressive infection control program on transmission of MRSA in the University Clinic of Respiratory and Allergic Diseases. All patients with MRSA carriage during 5 years (January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2002) were included and categorized into imported or hospital-acquired cases.

RESULTS:

Methicillin-resistant S aureus was recovered from 223 hospitalized patients; 142 cases were imported and 81 were acquired at our institution. After introduction of the comprehensive infection control program in 1999, the annual incidence of MRSA carriage per 1000 admissions increased from 4.5 in 1998 to 8.0 in 1999 (P = .02), and remained stable thereafter. In this period, the proportion of MRSA cases acquired in our institution decreased from 50.0% in 1999 to 6.1% in 2002 (P<.001), whereas the proportion of MRSA cases transferred from other hospitals (P<.001) and nursing homes (P = .03) increased. All 19 MRSA carriers with 3 sets of follow-up cultures were successfully decolonized.

CONCLUSIONS:

With a comprehensive infection control program, it was possible to reduce nosocomial transmission of MRSA in a highly endemic setting. With good hand hygiene using alcohol handrub, early detection, isolation, and a decolonization strategy, containment of MRSA was achievable, despite a high rate of transferred patients with MRSA.

PMID:
15477440
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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