Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1992 Jan;99(1):32-7.

Clinical assessment of fetal electrocardiogram monitoring in labour.

Author information

  • 1Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the potential clinical value of fetal electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring in labour.

DESIGN:

Descriptive study of the use of ECG waveform analysis during labour and its correlation with other indices of fetal and neonatal well-being.

SETTING:

Teaching hospital in Oxford.

SUBJECTS:

86 high risk pregnancies.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Suitability of ST Segment Analyser (Cinventa, Sweden) for clinical use; relation between the T/QRS ratio during labour (an index of ST segment and T wave elevation) and intrapartum cardiotocography, umbilical artery pH at birth and Apgar scores; T/QRS ratio trends in labour.

RESULTS:

The system was robust and user-friendly. No statistically significant relation was found between T/QRS ratios in labour and FHR abnormalities in the cardiotocograph. There was a weak relation between T/QRS ratios and umbilical artery acidosis: at a cervical dilatation of 4 cm, the Spearman rank correlation of the mean T/QRS ratio with umbilical artery actual base deficit was r = -0.31, 0.05 greater than P greater than 0.01. The correlation of T/QRS with the umbilical artery pH was not statistically significant, although a trend was present (Spearman rank: r = -0.26, P greater than 0.05). Correlation of the T/QRS ratio with Apgar scores at 1 and at 5 min was not statistically significant. Only 3 of 16 infants with an Apgar score of less than 7 at 1 min had a mean T/QRS ratio above 0.25 at any time during labour.

CONCLUSION:

Further research is necessary before a decision can be made whether this new method of fetal monitoring should be introduced into clinical practice.

PMID:
1547169
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk