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Br J Psychiatry. 2004 Oct;185:342-9.

Effect of web-based depression literacy and cognitive-behavioural therapy interventions on stigmatising attitudes to depression: randomised controlled trial.

Author information

  • 1Depression and Anxiety Consumer Research Unit, Centre for Mental Health Research, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia. Kathy.griffiths@anu.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Little is known about the efficacy of educational interventions for reducing the stigma associated with depression.

AIMS:

To investigate the effects on stigma of two internet depression sites.

METHOD:

A sample of 525 individuals with elevated scores on a depression assessment scale were randomly allocated to a depression information website (BluePages), a cognitive-behavioural skills training website (MoodGYM) or an attention control condition. Personal stigma (personal stigmatising attitudes to depression) and perceived stigma (perception of what most other people believe) were assessed before and after the intervention.

RESULTS:

Relative to the control, the internet sites significantly reduced personal stigma, although the effects were small. BluePages had no effect on perceived stigma and MoodGYM was associated with an increase in perceived stigma relative to the control. Changes in stigma were not mediated by changes in depression, depression literacy or cognitive-behavioural therapy literacy.

CONCLUSIONS:

The internet warrants further investigation as a means of delivering stigma reduction programmes for depression.

PMID:
15458995
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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