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Appetite. 2004 Oct;43(2):207-10.

Chewing gum can produce context-dependent effects upon memory.

Author information

  • 1School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Tower Building, Park Place, Cardiff, Wales CF10 3YG, UK.

Abstract

Two experiments examined whether chewing spearmint gum can affect the initial learning or subsequent recall of a word list. Comparing those participants in Experiment 1 who chewed gum at the learning or the recall phases showed that chewing gum at initial learning was associated with superior recall. In addition, chewing gum led to context-dependent effects as a switch between gum and no gum (or no gum and gum) between learning and recall led to poorer performance. Experiment 2 provided evidence that sucking gum was sufficient to induce some of the same effects as chewing.

PMID:
15458807
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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