Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Can Fam Physician. 2004 Aug;50:1098-101.

An approach to spider bites. Erroneous attribution of dermonecrotic lesions to brown recluse or hobo spider bites in Canada.

Author information

  • 1British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Saanichton. Robb.Bennett@gems6.gov.bc.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To dispel prevalent myths surrounding diagnosis of dermonecrotic and associated conditions supposedly resulting from bites of brown recluse, hobo, or other spiders in Canada.

SOURCES OF INFORMATION:

Worldwide, spider bites are regularly misdiagnosed as the etiologic agents in human dermonecrosis mainly as a result of inaccurate, erroneous, or hyperbolic popular and professional literature based on inference, circumstantial evidence, inferior clinical trials, and misunderstanding of the facts regarding spider-bite envenomation.

MAIN MESSAGE:

A working diagnosis of "spider bite" or publishing a case history should be considered only when a spider is caught in the act of biting or otherwise reliably associated with a lesion. Accurate identification of the spider could be critical for correct diagnosis and subsequent treatment.

CONCLUSION:

Brown recluse spiders are not found in Canada. Hobo spiders have not been reliably implicated in dermonecrosis. Worldwide, spider-bite envenomation is an unlikely cause of dermonecrosis. Canadian physicians should give priority consideration to other, more likely, causes.

Comment in

  • Must have been a spider. [Can Fam Physician. 2004]
  • Approaching spider bites. [Can Fam Physician. 2004]
PMID:
15455808
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2214648
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk