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Lancet. 2004 Sep 18-24;364(9439):1039-44.

Culture of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis from the blood of patients with Crohn's disease.

Author information

  • 1Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology and Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett College of Biomedical Sciences, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA. nasers@mail.ucf.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Crohn's disease, a form of inflammatory bowel disease, resembles some aspects of tuberculosis, leprosy, and paratuberculosis. The role of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in Crohn's disease is controversial.

METHODS:

We tested for MAP by PCR and culture in buffy coat preparations from 28 individuals with Crohn's disease, nine with ulcerative colitis, and 15 without inflammatory bowel disease.

FINDINGS:

MAP DNA in uncultured buffy coats was identified by PCR in 13 (46%) individuals with Crohn's disease, four (45%) with ulcerative colitis, and three (20%) without inflammatory bowel disease. Viable MAP was cultured from the blood of 14 (50%) patients with Crohn's disease, two (22%) with ulcerative colitis, and none of the individuals without inflammatory bowel disease. Current use of immunosuppressive medication did not correlate with a positive MAP culture. Sequencing of PCR products from MAP cultures confirmed the presence of the MAP-specific IS900 fragment. Among 11 MAP isolates assessed, we identified nine strains that were not identical.

INTERPRETATION:

We detected viable MAP in peripheral blood in a higher proportion of individuals with Crohn's disease than in controls. These data contribute to the evidence that MAP might be a cause of Crohn's disease.

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PMID:
15380962
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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