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Cancer. 2004 Oct 1;101(7):1623-31.

Stereotactic hypofractionated high-dose irradiation for stage I nonsmall cell lung carcinoma: clinical outcomes in 245 subjects in a Japanese multiinstitutional study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, Tamaho-cho, Nakakoma-gun, Japan. honishi@res.yamanashi-med.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Stereotactic irradiation (STI) has been actively performed using various methods to achieve better local control of Stage I nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) in Japan. The authors retrospectively evaluated results from a Japanese multiinstitutional study.

METHODS:

Patients with Stage I NSCLC (n = 245; median age, 76 years; T1N0M0, n = 155; T2N0M0, n = 90) were treated with hypofractionated high-dose STI in 13 institutions. Stereotactic three-dimensional treatment was performed using noncoplanar dynamic arcs or multiple static ports. A total dose of 18-75 gray (Gy) at the isocenter was administered in 1-22 fractions. The median calculated biologic effective dose (BED) was 108 Gy (range, 57-180 Gy).

RESULTS:

During follow-up (median, 24 months; range, 7-78 months), pulmonary complications of National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria Grade > 2 were observed in only 6 patients (2.4%). Local progression occurred in 33 patients (14.5%), and the local recurrence rate was 8.1% for BED > or = 100 Gy compared with 26.4% for < 100 Gy (P < 0.05). The 3-year overall survival rate of medically operable patients was 88.4% for BED > or = 100 Gy compared with 69.4% for < 100 Gy (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Hypofractionated high-dose STI with BED < 150 Gy was feasible and beneficial for curative treatment of patients with Stage I NSCLC. For all treatment methods and schedules, local control and survival rates were better with BED > or = 100 Gy compared with < 100 Gy. Survival rates in selected patients (medically operable, BED > or = 100 Gy) were excellent, and were potentially comparable to those of surgery.

(c) 2004 American Cancer Society.

PMID:
15378503
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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