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P R Health Sci J. 2004 Jun;23(2):89-93.

Comparison of oral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) versus conventional therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare effectiveness of oral therapy with reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to conventional modalities of treatment in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).

BACKGROUND:

CFS is a potentially disabling condition of unknown etiology. Although its clinical presentation is associated to a myriad of symptoms, fatigue is a universal and essential finding for its diagnosis. No therapeutic regimen has proven effective for this condition.

METHODS:

A total of 31 patients fulfilling the Centers for Disease Control criteria for CFS, were randomly assigned to either NADH or nutritional supplements and psychological therapy for 24 months. A thorough medical history, physical examination and completion of a questionnaire on the severity of fatigue and other symptoms were performed each trimester of therapy. In addition, all of them underwent evaluation in terms of immunological parameters and viral antibody titers. Statistical analysis was applied to the demographic data, as well as to symptoms scores at baseline and at each trimester of therapy.

RESULTS:

The twelve patients who received NADH had a dramatic and statistically significant reduction of the mean symptom score in the first trimester (p < 0.001). However, symptom scores in the subsequent trimesters of therapy were similar in both treatment groups. Elevated IgG and Ig E antibody levels were found in a significant number of patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

Observed effectiveness of NADH over conventional treatment in the first trimester of the trial and the trend of improvement of that modality in the subsequent trimesters should be further assessed in a larger patient sample.

PMID:
15377055
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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