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Otol Neurotol. 2004 Sep;25(5):811-7.

Vestibular schwannoma growth rates in neurofibromatosis type 2 natural history consortium subjects.

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  • 1House Ear Institute, Los Angeles, California 90057, USA. wslattery@hei.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the amount of growth in vestibular schwannomas in Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients from diagnosis through short-term (up to 2 yr) and long-term (up to 4 yr) follow-up.

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) films were obtained on subjects enrolled in the NF2 Natural History study and examined for changes in vestibular schwannoma size over time.

SETTING:

Data were collected from nine foreign and domestic NF2 centers, including hospital-based, academic, and tertiary care centers.

SUBJECTS:

NF2 patients with MRI data and at least one follow-up examination within 9 months to 2 years of diagnosis were included; n=56 patients with 84 lesions for evaluation of growth.

INTERVENTION:

Routine, clinically obtained, magnetic resonance images were digitized and measured using image management software. Short-term follow-up was defined as up to 2 years (n=84 lesions), and long-term follow-up was defined as 3 to 4 years (n=29 lesions).

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Vestibular schwannoma size was assessed using anterior-posterior, medial-lateral, and greatest diameter linear measurements.

RESULTS:

Vestibular schwannomas increased in size (at least 5 mm) in 8% of the vestibular schwannomas across short-term follow-up. At long-term follow-up, 13% of the tumors had increased in size. On average, schwannomas increased in greatest diameter 1.3 mm per year across short-term follow-up.

CONCLUSION:

Slightly greater than 1 in 10 diagnosed NF2-related vestibular schwannomas increased in size by at least 5 mm by 4 years of follow-up, if still untreated at that time.

PMID:
15354016
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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